‘The Hand of God’ is why Maradona was hated and loved by football fans

Former Argentine captain, Diego Maradona passed away aged 60 after suffering a cardiorespiratory arrest on Wednesday, 25 November 2020. One of the greatest players of all time, Diego Maradona played a great role in 1986 when Argentina won the 1986 World Cup.

The Argentine scored the most infamous goal in football history against England at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico – and then the greatest shortly after. Diego Maradona once said that his enduring fame owes much to the ‘Hand of God’.

Diego Maradona lifting the World Cup

The Argentine scored the most infamous goal in football history against England at the 1986 World Cup in Mexico – and then the greatest shortly after. Diego Maradona once said that his enduring fame owes much to the ‘Hand of God’.

Indeed, it is impossible to discuss Maradona’s first goal for Argentina in their 2-1 win over England in the quarter-finals of the 1986 World Cup without almost immediately mentioning his second.

The two are bound together in footballing folklore, perfectly contrasting examples of the ingenuity of the most polarising personality the game is ever likely to see.

Maradona was the quintessential troubled genius, a man blessed with a gift that cursed him with a level of fame, which he found himself unable to handle.

Diego Maradona

If only he still plays football in this era, he would undoubtedly benefit from more protection from referees – and arguably from himself.

For better or for worse, the match also propelled Maradona towards superstardom, casting him as the game’s most compelling anti-hero.

Should the ‘Hand of God’ have been disallowed? Absolutely! But there is no denying the perfect poetry of the most divisive figure in football following up the most infamous goal in history with its most beautiful just four minutes later.

There is so much more to the Maradona story than what happened that day in Mexico City but that game perfectly encapsulated his character.

Diego Maradona

It will clearly never be forgotten either. Even after his passing on Wednesday, the English tabloid press labelled him “a villain” and “a cheat”, with the Daily Star even asking “Where was VAR when we needed it most?” while the rest of the football world was mourning the death of its god.

In addition, that level of polarisation, that kind of insanity, can only be explained by two goals – not just one.

He played for Barcelona and Napoli during his club career, winning two Serie A titles with the Italian side.

May his soul rest in peace

 

Total Views: 114 ,

Author

  • Agbelusi Samuel is a campus journalist, writer, red carpet host, political and sport analyst. A political science student that covers news and politics beats for AAUA INSIDER.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.